Article

NATO 75th Anniversary

Statement by former NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen marking the Alliance’s seventy-fifth anniversary:

“Born from the ashes of the Second World War, NATO has maintained peace and security in the Euro-Atlantic for seventy-five years—and it is stronger today than ever before.

As we mark NATO’s seventy-fifth anniversary, it is essential that we prepare our Alliance for the next twenty-five years—and beyond. That means dealing with the reality of a militarised and aggressive Russia. Europe must urgently increase its investments in our collective defence. Europe doing more does not weaken NATO, it reinforces its foundations.

The best response to Russia’s aggression is strength, resolve, and unity. That is what we must show by inviting Ukraine to join the Alliance without delay. Long-term security in the Euro-Atlantic area will only be possible with Ukraine at the heart of NATO.

NATO is the bedrock of security for more than nine hundred and sixty-million people, spanning thirty-two countries across two continents.

Our Alliance is one of history’s great achievements—and may we never take it for granted.”

Article

How to deepen EU-Armenia relations

Former prime ministers, commissioners, ministers, and sitting parliamentarians release report calling for more Europe in Armenia; more Armenia in Europe.

Armenia is pivoting to the West. The European Union has an interest in supporting this reorientation in order to strengthen Armenia’s democracy and help bring lasting peace to the South Caucasus.

The Friends of Armenia Network, led by former Danish Prime Minister and NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen, today released a report which outlines a detailed vision for making Armenia’s Western trajectory irreversible.

This approach includes proposals for building up Armenian resilience and lessening its dependence on Russia; deepening trade ties between Armenia and the European Union; and enhancing Armenia’s border security and security cooperation with Europe.

Ultimately, the report argues that Armenia’s accession to the European Union is central to making Armenia’s foreign policy pivot and democratic transition last.

Speaking following the release of the report, Anders Fogh Rasmussen said:

“Armenia is a democracy in an incredibly difficult geopolitical neighbourhood. Prime Minister Pashinyan’s government has made the courageous decision to diversify Armenia’s foreign policy and move towards the West.

“The world’s democracies—and the European Union, in particular—must act to support Armenia in this pivot.

“This support has become even more important following Azerbaijan’s 2023 offensive against the ethnic-Armenian population of Nagorno-Karabakh and the continued threat posed by Azeri forces.

“Russia’s illegal invasion of Ukraine has shown that the European Union must do far more to stand up for democracies in its direct neighbourhood.

“Europe has an opportunity to support a stable democracy and lasting peace in the South Caucasus. Today’s report outlines the tangible steps that can and should be taken, ultimately leading to Armenia joining the European Union.”

The full report is available here: FAN Report – Deepening EU-Armenia relations

List of signatories:

Anders Fogh Rasmussen: Chairman of the Friends of Armenia Network, Founder of Rasmussen Global, NATO Secretary General (2009-2014), Prime Minister of Denmark (2001-2009).

Włodzimierz Cimoszewicz: Member of the European Parliament (2019-…), Prime Minister of Poland (1996-1997), Poland’s Minister of Foreign Affairs (2001-2005).

Štefan Füle: European Commissioner for Enlargement and Neighbourhood Policy (2010-2014), Minister of European Affairs of the Czech Republic (2009).

Charles Flanagan: Member of the Irish Oireachtas (2020-…), Chair of the Parliamentary Committee on Foreign Affairs and Defence (2020-…), Ireland’s Minister of Justice (2017-2020), Ireland’s Minister of Foreign Affairs (2014-2017).

Raimundas Lopata: Member of the Lithuanian Seimas (2020-…), Chair of the Parliamentary Friendship Group with Armenia (2020-…)

Dietmar Nietan: Member of the German Bundestag (1998-2002, 2005-…), Treasurer of the Social Democratic Party.

Anne-Laurence Petel: Member of the French Assemblée nationale (2017-…), Chair of the Parliamentary Friendship Group with Armenia (2022-…).

As observers:

Dalia Grybauskaitė: President of Lithuania (2009-2019), EU Commissioner for Budget (2004-2009).

Thorniké Gordadzé: Georgia’s State Minister for Euro-Atlantic Integration (2012), Georgia’s Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs (2010-2012).

Peter Semneby: EU Special Representative to the South Caucasus (2006-2011).


The report was drafted by the independent Friends of Armenia Network and does not represent the policy of the Armenian government.

Since March 2023, Rasmussen Global has been working with the Armenian government to improve connections with the European Union and the wider democratic world.

Article

Low-Earth orbit fragility is a threat to our autonomy in space

The Russian war in Ukraine has highlighted the importance of dual-use space capabilities. 

With strong economic incentives for the deployment of mega-constellations of several thousands of expandable satellites,  valuables resources in low-Earth orbit (LEO) have become increasingly congested and contested. LEO fragility is defined by the growing risks to the integrity of space systems and to the safe conduct of space operations in this environment.

In the latest paper, Rasmussen Global’s experts outline the concept of LEO fragility and encourage law makers to adopt pre-emptive measures in the framework of new legislations to preserve our autonomy in space. 

 

Article

How to ensure EU sanctions on Russia work effectively

Since Russia’s illegal annexation of Crimea in 2014, the EU has progressively imposed sanctions against Russia. Following the full-scale invasion of Ukraine in February 2022 these have been vastly scaled up.

The European Commission will soon announce its 12th sanctions package. This will likely involve an import ban on Russian diamonds and the targeting of Russian ICT companies, among other elements. However, the EU and its Member States still face serious challenges in enforcing previously agreed sanctions. Enforcement becomes increasingly complex with every new round of sanctions.

One major difficulty is the significant variation between the competent authorities in different member states, as well as in enforcement mechanisms and penalties.

In the latest paper by Rasmussen Global experts, we outline how the EU develops new packages of sanctions, what are the major issues with enforcement, and set out recommendations on how they can be made more effective.

 

 

Article Ukraine

How to help Ukraine win the drone war

Following Russia’s full-scale invasion, the Armed Forces of Ukraine and the Ukrainian defence industry have had to rapidly adapt. They have been forced to reconceptualise existing weapons as well as develop new ones, often utilising civilian systems for military purposes. The country has become both a laboratory and live testing ground for the deployment of evolving military technologies. Nowhere is this clearer than for drones and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles.

While more primitive and limited in the number of systems available, Russia has progressively gained an edge both in the production and deployment of reconnaissance and strike drones. Combined with a long-standing edge in electronic warfare, Ukraine faces the challenge of scaling up both the quality and quantity of its systems to respond to Russian superiority in drone warfare.

Read the latest paper from Rasmussen Global experts on how Ukraine, with help of its allies, can regain its edge and win the drone war.

 

Article

Rasmussen Global is expanding its team across Europe, with new hires in Kyiv, Brussels, Copenhagen and Stockholm

In Stockholm, Fredrik Wesslau joins as a Senior Advisor. Fredrik brings more than two decades of experience of security policy and geopolitics, including hands-on work in the field. He was until the end of 2022, Deputy Head of the EU Advisory Mission in Ukraine. Before that, Fredrik worked for the UN, EU, and OSCE in Kosovo, South Caucasus, and Sudan/South Sudan. He also worked on counter-piracy off the Horn of Africa. Fredrik adds to Rasmussen Global’s host of experts on geopolitics and particularly Ukraine.

In Copenhagen, Mathias Bay Lynggaard joins Rasmussen Global following more than a decade at the Danish Broadcasting Corporation. For the last five years, he was the host of Denmark’s most popular current affairs radio program, Orientering. He brings a wealth of experience from covering national politics and foreign affairs as a reporter, analyst, and host. Mathias will bolster Rasmusen Global’s work in Denmark and across Europe, focusing on energy, security, and geopolitics.

Bogdana Fedun strengthens Rasmussen Global’s presence in Kyiv, bringing wide range of experience in both politics and communications. She has been working closely on plans for Ukraine’s reconstruction after the war, and is a specialist on Ukraine’s relationship with Europe – most recently advising French entities on reform and reconstruction in Ukraine. She previously worked as an advisor at the French Assemblée Nationale. Bogdana will work on Rasmussen Global’s projects in Ukraine, advising businesses on opportunities and support for Ukraine.

In Brussels, Celine Emma la Cour joins from the European External Action Service (EEAS) where she focused on relations with Southeast Asia. Celine brings valuable experience from geopolitics, diplomacy and communications working for, among others, the Danish Defence Command, the International Secretariat of the Danish Parliament, and the Danish Embassy in Moscow. In Brussels, Celine will focus on
Rasmussen Global’s sovereign clients. Also in Brussels, Lise Erard has been promoted to Policy Advisor. Lise has experience in economics, international politics, and European affairs. She works primarily on Rasmussen Global’s aerospace and sovereign clients.

Speaking on the expansion, Rasmussen Global CEO Fabrice Pothier said:

“I am glad to welcome such new, diverse talents to our expanding team. We are on an exciting journey, helping our clients to make sense of this transformative era. Rasmussen Global is fast becoming the go-to firm in Europe on strategic affairs and geopolitics.”

Article

Former NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen to visit Armenia

Rasmussen Global founder Anders Fogh Rasmussen arrives today in Yerevan for a two-day visit to Armenia. During the trip, he will meet with Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan and other leading public officials. The former NATO Secretary General will also meet with figures from civil society and visit the Armenian regions most affected by the ongoing incursions by neighbouring Azerbaijan.

The visit aims to raise awareness of the humanitarian crisis caused by the blockade of the Lachin corridor, the only road connecting Nagorno-Karabakh with Armenia, and the outside world.

Speaking ahead of the visit to Armenia, Anders Fogh Rasmussen said:

“Europe cannot close its eyes to a humanitarian crisis happening on our doorstep. The ongoing blockade of the Lachin corridor by Azerbaijani actors is putting thousands of lives at risk. Since December, no civilian or commercial traffic has been able to reach Nagorno-Karabakh. This has left some 120,000 ethnic Armenian residents without access to essential goods and services, including life-saving medication and health care. Ongoing attacks on civil infrastructure, including gas an electricity supply, have also created far-reaching impacts on the economy, education and healthcare.”

“Unless Europe and the wider international community act, these risks becoming a humanitarian catastrophe. The EU must use its relationship with Azerbaijan, to push them to lift the blockade and fulfil their broader international commitments.

“I am also in Yerevan to show my support for Armenia’s burgeoning democracy. Since 2018, Armenia has made important steps forward. In a period when democratic rights have slipped globally, Armenia is the welcome exception. We must strengthen the relationship between the EU and Armenia, to secure peace in the region and support the Armenian people’s desire for a future based on stability, freedom, and democracy.”

For media requests during the visit, please contact Rasmussen Global Communications Director Tim Allan at tal@rasmussenglobal.com

Article NATO Op-ed Russia US

The United States Must Be the World’s Policeman

Only America has the material and moral greatness to stop the slide into chaos and foster peace

By Anders Fogh Rasmussen

Barely had I been seated before Vladimir Putin told me that NATO—the organization that I then headed—no longer had any purpose and should be disbanded. “After the end of the Cold War, we dissolved the Warsaw Pact,” he said. “Similarly, you should dissolve NATO. That is a relic from the Cold War.”

During my visit to Moscow in December 2009, I sensed that President Putin was challenging the world order that the U.S. created so successfully after World War II. Beginning in 2014, he invaded Ukraine and launched a military action in Syria.

From my former positions as prime minister of Denmark and secretary-general of NATO, I know how important American leadership is. We desperately need a U.S. president who is able and willing to lead the free world and counter autocrats like President Putin. A president who will lead from the front, not from behind.

The world needs such a policeman if freedom and prosperity are to prevail against the forces of oppression, and the only capable, reliable and desirable candidate for the position is the United States. The presidential elections thus come at a pivotal point in history.

The Middle East is torn by war. In North Africa, Libya has collapsed and become a breeding ground for terrorists. In Eastern Europe, a resurgent Russia has brutally attacked and grabbed land by force from Ukraine. China is flexing its muscles against its neighbors—and the rogue state of North Korea is threatening a nuclear attack.

In this world of interconnections, it has become a cliché to talk about the “global village.“ But right now, the village is burning, and the neighbors are fighting in the light of the flames. Just as we need a policeman to restore order; we need a firefighter to put out the flames of conflict, and a kind of mayor, smart and sensible, to lead the rebuilding.

Only America can play all these roles, because of all world powers, America alone has the credibility to shape sustainable solutions to these challenges. Russia is obsessed with rebuilding the empire the Soviet Union lost. China is still primarily a regional actor. Europe is weak, divided and leaderless. The old powers of Britain and France are simply too small and exhausted to play the global role they once did.

This is not simply about means. It is also about morality. Just as only America has the material greatness to stop the slide into chaos, only America has the moral greatness to do it—not for the sake of power, but for the sake of peace.

Yet the U.S. will only be able to shape the solutions the world needs if its leaders act with conviction. When America retrenches and retreats—if the world even thinks that American restraint reflects a lack of willingness to engage in preventing and resolving conflicts—it leaves a vacuum that will be filled by crooked autocrats across the world.

The Obama administration’s reluctance to lead the world has had serious consequences, and none is graver than the behavior of Mr. Putin. While Europe and the U.S. slept, he launched a ruthless military operation in support of the Assad regime in Syria and tried to present Russia as a global power challenging the U.S. in importance. In Europe, he is trying to carve out a sphere of influence and establish Russia as a regional power capable of diminishing American influence.

These are only a few examples of what is now at stake as autocrats, terrorists and rogue states challenge America’s leadership of the international rules-based order—which was created after World War II and which secured for the world an unprecedented period of peace, progress and prosperity.

The next president must acknowledge this inheritance. American isolationism will not make the U.S. and other freedom-loving countries safer and more prosperous, it will make them less so and unleash a plague of dictators and other oppressors. Above all, American isolationism will threaten the future of the rules-based international world order that has brought freedom and prosperity to so many people.

Mr. Rasmussen, a former prime minister of Denmark and a former secretary-general of NATO, is the author of “The Will to Lead—America’s Indispensable Role in the Global Fight For Freedom,” out this month from HarperCollins/Broadside Books. 

Source: The Wall Street Journal

Article Brussels Company news Denmark EU Press release

Rasmussen Global expands in Berlin, Brussels, and Copenhagen

Rasmussen Global, the political advisory firm founded by former NATO Secretary General and Danish Prime Minister Anders Fogh Rasmussen, is expanding its presence in Berlin, Brussels, and Copenhagen. In Berlin, Nico Lange has joined as a Senior Advisor. Nico was previously Chief of Staff at the Federal Ministry of Defence of Germany from 2019 to […]

Rasmussen Global, the political advisory firm founded by former NATO Secretary General and Danish Prime Minister Anders Fogh Rasmussen, is expanding its presence in Berlin, Brussels, and Copenhagen.

In Berlin, Nico Lange has joined as a Senior Advisor. Nico was previously Chief of Staff at the Federal Ministry of Defence of Germany from 2019 to 2022, under Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer. He brings vast experience from the top echelons of German politics, holding numerous senior positions in the German CDU party. Nico served as director of the Ukraine office of Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung in Kyiv from 2006-2012 and was awarded a Robert Bosch Fellowship in St. Petersburg, Russia from 2003-2006. He is a fluent Ukrainian and Russian speaker and adds to Rasmussen Global’s growing reputation as the go-to consultancy on all issues regarding Ukraine.

In Brussels, Helene Bille Albrechtsen has joined as a project manager focused on critical raw materials and energy. Having most recently served in the Cabinet of European Commission Executive Vice-President Margrethe Vestager, as well as having worked four years with trade in the Danish Ministry of Business, Helene is an expert on the European regulatory landscape and its strategic agenda. Meanwhile, Arthur de Liedekerke has been appointed as the new Director for European Affairs. Arthur will continue working on areas related to cyber, digital policy, and space, while also focusing on business development. Harry Nedelcu is the new Director for Geopolitics. Harry will focus on Rasmussen Global’s sovereign clients and the firm’s work on Ukraine.

In Copenhagen, Rasmus Grand Berthelsen has been promoted to become Director for the Nordics. Rasmus works closely on green energy policy and will also work on business development in the region. Rasmussen Global’s Copenhagen office has been strengthened with the appointment of Betzy Hänninen and Marie-Cæcilie Adamsen as Policy Advisors. Betzy joins Rasmussen Global from the Nordic Council of Ministers, having previously worked at the European Free Trade Association (EFTA) and as a conscript soldier in the Royal Norwegian Air Force. Marie-Cæcilie joins Rasmussen Global from the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, where she worked on development and security policy. She focused on the MENA region and Eastern Europe, most recently on the war in Ukraine.

Speaking on the recent expansion, Rasmussen Global CEO Fabrice Pothier said: “It is exciting to bring in and promote so many great talents at Rasmussen Global. We continue our journey to become the prime political consultancy firm in Europe on strategic affairs and geopolitics.”

Article Report Russia Security Guarantees Ukraine

Read the Kyiv Security Compact

THE KYIV SECURITY COMPACT

Co-Chairs of the Working Group on International Security Guarantees for Ukraine

  • Mr. Anders Fogh Rasmussen
  • Mr. Andrii Yermak

Read the full report here

 

Key recommendations:

  • The strongest security guarantee for Ukraine lies in its capacity to defend itself
    against an aggressor under the UN Charter’s article 51. To do so, Ukraine
    needs the resources to maintain a significant defensive force capable of
    withstanding the Russian Federation’s armed forces and paramilitaries.
  • This requires a multi-decade effort of sustained investment in Ukraine’s
    defence industrial base, scalable weapons transfers and intelligence support
    from allies, intensive training missions and joint exercises under the European
    Union and NATO flags.
  • The security guarantees will be positive; they lay out a range of commitments
    made by a group of guarantors, together with Ukraine. They need to be binding
    based on bilateral agreements, but brought together under a joint strategic
    partnership document – called the Kyiv Security Compact.
  • The Compact will bring a core group of allied countries together with Ukraine.
    This could include the US, UK, Canada, Poland, Italy, Germany, France,
    Australia, Turkey, and Nordic, Baltic, Central and Eastern European countries
Article

Yermak and Rasmussen present recommendations for security guarantees in Kyiv

Ukraine’s independence and sovereignty depend on its ability to defend itself. To ensure this, Ukraine needs a set of cast-iron security guarantees from its allies. This was the key message from Andriy Yermak and Anders Fogh Rasmussen when they presented their joint recommendations on security guarantees for Ukraine today in Kyiv. In July, President Zelenskyy […]

Ukraine’s independence and sovereignty depend on its ability to defend itself. To ensure this, Ukraine needs a set of cast-iron security guarantees from its allies. This was the key message from Andriy Yermak and Anders Fogh Rasmussen when they presented their joint recommendations on security guarantees for Ukraine today in Kyiv.

In July, President Zelenskyy tasked the Head of his Presidential Office and the former NATO Secretary General to prepare recommendations on how to protect Ukraine’s sovereignty for the long-term. The recommendations were based on input from an expert group from across the democratic world. This included former Prime Ministers, Ministers, as well as senior officials and academics.

The recommendations call for the creation of a Kyiv Security Compact, a joint strategic partnership document bringing together the guarantor countries with Ukraine.

The recommendations envisage a multi-tiered approach to guarantees. A core group of allies will provide cast-iron commitments to support Ukraine’s armed forces and a broader group will provide non-military guarantees, built around sanctions.

 

Speaking at the launch of the recommendations, Andriy Yermak said:

“Today we are presenting the result of work that has no precedents in recent history, just as the act of full-scale aggression by a nuclear power and the UN Security Council member against a sovereign European state is unprecedented. With the help of allies, Ukraine is successfully resisting this invasion. However, it should be noted that decisions often had to be made ad hoc, and the development of mechanisms for this aid required a lot of time, which is always lacking in war, and which is bought with pain, blood, and lives,” said Andriy Yermak, speaking at the recommendations presentation.

The head of the Presidential Office stressed that the Ukrainians foiled the aggressor’s plans and defended their country, and the occupied lands will certainly be returned. Meanwhile, it is necessary to ensure that Ukraine is fully secured in the future.

“We must make sure that the slogan ‘We can do it again’ causes panic attacks and bad memories among Russians. That they say “Never again!” in reply. To this end, we need a military power strong enough to repel the Russians’ desire for revenge. And it must be capable of causing irreparable damage to the aggressor if this desire turns out to be irresistible. Security guarantees are aimed at helping us create such a power,” Andriy Yermak said.

At the same time, he emphasized that the agreement on security guarantees for Ukraine is not a substitute for joining NATO – it is a means of ensuring security until it happens.

 

Former NATO Secretary General and Danish Prime Minister Anders Fogh Rasmussen added:

“The immediate priority is that Ukraine wins this war. Right now, Ukraine is showing on the frontlines that with the necessary resources, they can defeat Russia on the battlefield. Ukrainians are showing the will to fight, the democratic world must continue to give them the means to fight.

Once this war is over, we must ensure that Russia can never invade again. The best way to do that is by Ukraine having a significant military force capable of withstanding any future Russian attack. Building and maintaining such a force requires a multi-decade commitment from Ukraine’s allies.

“Adopting these recommendations would send a strong signal to Vladimir Putin. It would show that our commitment to Ukraine will not falter, that his war is futile. It would also send a message to the Ukrainian people, that we are committed to Ukraine’s independence and sovereignty for as long as it takes.

“Getting this right means building a new cornerstone of European security. Failing to do so means a festering crisis on European soil.”

 

Key recommendations of the report

  • The strongest security guarantee for Ukraine lies in its capacity to defend itself against an aggressor under the UN Charter’s article 51. To do so, Ukraine needs the resources to maintain a significant defensive force capable of withstanding the Russian Federation’s armed forces and paramilitaries.
  • This requires a multi-decade effort of sustained investment in Ukraine’s defence industrial base, scalable weapons transfers and intelligence support from allies, intensive training missions and joint exercises under the European Union and NATO flags.
  • The security guarantees should be affirmative and clearly formulated; they lay out a range of commitments made by a group of guarantors, together with Ukraine. They need to be legally and politically binding based on bilateral agreements but brought together under a joint strategic partnership document – called the Kyiv Security Compact.
  • The package of guarantees includes preventive measures of a military, financial, infrastructural, technical, and information nature to prevent new aggression, as well as measures to be taken immediately in the event of a new encroachment on the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Ukraine. In addition, the structure of the Kyiv Security Compact includes a full-fledged sanctions package against the aggressor state, and may also include additional components, such as agreements on providing Ukraine with modern air defense/anti-missile systems, regional agreements on security in the Black Sea, and others.
  • The Compact will bring a core group of allied countries together with Ukraine. This could include the US, UK, Canada, Poland, Italy, Germany, France, Australia, Turkey, and Nordic, Baltic, and Central European countries.

The security guarantees are not a replacement for Ukraine’s ambition to join NATO. This aspiration is safeguarded in the Ukrainian constitution and is a sovereign decision for Ukraine. Ukraine is also on the path to EU membership. As an EU member, Ukraine will benefit from the EU’s own mutual defence clause. Both NATO and EU membership will bolster Ukraine’s security in the long-term. The guarantees outlined today in no way undermine these aims but will ensure that Ukraine has what it needs to defend itself under any circumstance.

Article Press release Ukraine

Working group on security guarantees for Ukraine kicks off in Kyiv

The first meeting of the high-level working group on security guarantees for Ukraine took place yesterday in Kyiv. The group is co-chaired by the Head of the Ukrainian President’s Office Andriy Yermark, and former Danish Prime Minister and NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen. The co-chairs launched the meeting in person, while other members of […]

The first meeting of the high-level working group on security guarantees for Ukraine took place yesterday in Kyiv. The group is co-chaired by the Head of the Ukrainian President’s Office Andriy Yermark, and former Danish Prime Minister and NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen. The co-chairs launched the meeting in person, while other members of the group joined online.

When this war ends, Ukraine will need reliable and effective security guarantees from allied countries. These must provide a strong and credible deterrence, to prevent further Russian aggression. The purpose of the international working group is to provide recommendations on what these guarantees could look like and how they can work in practice. These can then form the basis for international treaties between Ukraine and guarantor states.

The group’s work will be guided by four key principles. First, Ukraine’s independence relies on its ability to defend itself. Second, its defence capabilities depend on successful reconstruction. Third sanctions are fundamental in protecting Ukraine’s security. Lastly, Ukraine’s future is as a sovereign nation at the heart of Europe.

Speaking at the kick off meeting Co-Chair Andriy Yermark said:

“We need a comprehensive and reliable solution. We must stop Russia, fully restore the territorial integrity and sovereignty of Ukraine, and deprive Russia of the possibility of continuing the game of historical reconstruction in the future. We need effective guarantees to deter aggression – military, political, diplomatic, institutional, financial.”

Co-Chair Anders Fogh Rasmussen said:

“I was in Irpin yesterday morning and saw first-hand the destruction and barbarism of Russia’s war. The visit reinforced two things I believe strongly. First, Ukraine must win this war. Second, this can never be allowed to happen again. This matters to all of us. There will be no stability in Europe until there is a lasting peace in Ukraine. That is the purpose of this group, to find a workable model that can guarantee Ukraine’s independence and security for the future.”

The composition of the working group is:

• Andriy Yermak, Ukraine, Head of the Office of the President of Ukraine (Co-Chair)
• Anders Fogh Rasmussen, Denmark, Former Prime Minister and NATO Secretary General (Co-Chair)
• Kevin Rudd, Australia, Prime Minister (2007-2010; 2013), Foreign Minister (2010-2012), and President of the Asia Society
• Carl Bildt, Sweden, Prime Minister (1991-1994) and Foreign Minister (2006-2014)
• Lord William J. Hague of Richmond, UK, Foreign Secretary (2010-2014)
• Michèle A. Flournoy, USA, Under Secretary of Defense for Policy (2009-2012)
• Norbert Röttgen, Germany, Chair of Bundestag Foreign Affairs Committee (2014-2021) and Environment Minister (2009-2012)
• Giampiero Massolo, Italy, President of the Italian Institute for International Political Studies
• Anna Fotyga, Poland, MEP (2014-present) and Foreign Affairs Minister of Poland (2006-2007)
• Adam Eberhardt, Poland, Director of the Centre for Eastern Studies (OSW)
• Marie Dumoulin, France, Director Wider Europe programme, European Council on Foreign Relations.
• Andrii Kostin, Ukraine, Member of the Parliament of Ukraine, Moderator of the Group
• Roxana Cristescu, Ukraine, Senior Advisor at the European Institute of Peace (EIP)

(Members are taking part in a personal capacity, not as representatives of their organisations).

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